Posts tagged ‘Chicago Heights’

Who The Heck ARE You Guys Anyway?

I guess this should have been our first blog post. But, since I was completely new to this blog-stuff, it just had not materialized. So, here it goes…

The Chicago Heights Historic Preservation Advisory Committee (CHHPAC) is a volunteer appointed city committee. The committee was established in 1996.

Our mission is to protect, serve, foster and perpetuate the distinctive Architectural and Historical qualities of Chicago Heights.  We accomplish our mission through overseeing the city’s landmark ordinance, educational programming, advising city officials as to the importance of Chicago Heights’ historic resources, and by encouraging sensitive treatment of landmark and vintage properties.

Rt. 30 & Schilling, now a local landmark

Rt. 30 & Schilling, now a local landmark

Landmarked properties have to abide by the city’s design guidelines, or guidelines set forth in the individual landmark designation. When there is proposed changes to these properties/sites, there is an added review of work to the exterior of the building/site that looks at materials and style appropriateness. We provide this review. The review safeguards the Landmark’s authenticity, and the owners investment.

The goal is help the city to preserve the historical and architectural integrity of Chicago Heights.

We are not a historical society, but we often fill that role when needed because Chicago Heights does not have one. However, the Chicago Heights Public Library also helps fill that role. They house a great deal of historic documents, photos, and items that a historic society would and have a great deal of information for those studying Chicago Heights History.

Historic preservation principles are not just for Landmark properties. Sensitive treatment and maintenance of your building will safeguard your investment. Not all beautiful “old” structures are Landmarks. They just have been lucky enough to have had stewards throughout its life who were as proud of it when it was 30 years old as when it was 100. (oh, man, I think that is a whole blog post in and of itself!)

For more information on who we are and what we do, please visit our website. There you will find information and links on proper treatment to your vintage – or landmark – property, the how and why your original windows are so important and even better than replacement windows, our list of local landmarks, applications for landmark status or our programs, and much more.

“Therefore, when we build, let us think that we build for ever.  Let it not be for present delight, nor for present use alone; let it be such work as our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone on stone, that a time is to come when those stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them,
“See! this our fathers did for us.” For, indeed, the greatest glory of a building is not in its stones, or in its gold. Its glory is in its Age. ”
John Ruskin

Advertisements

Guest Columnist Reflects on Black History Month

undergroundrailroad[1]193616Born and raised in Chicago Heights, I wanted to share a little, since black history
month is here. As a child I was able to visit Canada to see places and trails on the Underground Railroad.
My parents, both being African American, wanted me to see what African Americans had to
experience to achieve freedom. Recently, I have learned that the Underground Railroad was also
here in Chicago Heights.
The “Underground Railroad” became a major force leading to the
elimination of slavery. Runaway slaves called passengers, usually traveled to their
destinations by night either alone or in small groups. Whenever possible black and
white abolitionists provided food and shelter at stopping places known as “stations”
or served as “conductors” providing transportation between stations. The Underground Railroad remained active until the end of the Civil war as black bondsmen continued to use the system to flee the horrors of slavery.
The Bacheldor and McCoy homes in Thorn Grove, later Chicago Heights, were stops on the Underground
Railroad. When I found this information out, I became admirable of Chicago Heights.  How brave my ancestors were to
travel North, knowing that they might have had to travel this way for freedom.  It makes me realize how much America as changed since that time. I agree American still needs more growth change. But what I can say, I am glad to be an American. Land of the free and home of the brave.

Belinda James

Belinda James is a member of the Chicago Heights Historic Preservation Advisory Committee

A few notes: Sauk Trail is one of the early, highly traveled Native American trails used heavily between 1849 and 1853 by those traveling West for gold, to Iowa for land, or to Kansas or Canada to escape slavery. The Bacheldor farm was located at the intersection of what is now Sauk Trail and Western Avenues, the McCoy’s about a mile east near Thorn Creek. These families hid slaves from Missouri between Joliet and Dyer on their way to Canada. – Chicago Heights; At the Crossroads of the Nation by Dominic Candeloro & Barbara Paul800px-Undergroundrailroadsmall2

Driving the Dixie 2012

If you didn’t make it out to Chicago Heights for Driving the Dixie, you missed a wonderful event.

Over 300 people enjoyed the Gallery’s amazing art, our own Mike Bonhart’s fascinating display of Chicago Heights memorabilia, and all the cool CARS!

We gave away these great magnets to all that participated. –>

There was even a great display put up and staffed by the Park Forest Historical Society & Museum’s president, Michael Gans.  If you haven’t visited their museum, you really should get over there!  They also have an archive. Check out their website, and donate to keeping history alive.

Additionally, a hearty “Thank You” goes out to the Union Street Gallery for hosting the Driving the Dixie stop in Chicago Heights. It serves as a wonderful spot for people – many not from our area – to see what a wonderful art community we have, and some of our fantastic architecture. If you haven’t been to the Gallery yet, you really need to go, and go often. New shows are opening all the time. I see something new and wonderful each time I am there.

Call me crazy – you won’t be the first – but the  Elks Building/Union Street Gallery looked, well,  happy. If a building could smile, I think it was. Beautiful, used, cared for, and all the people enjoying it.  Well, it made me happy to see such a great building in its most recent incarnation so loved and vibrant.  And the Star building across the street made a nice backdrop for all the sweet rides that parked in front of it.

Check out some of the photos: